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Robert Horton
1924-2016
Robert Horton - Rest in Peace - We Will Miss You
Rest in Peace
 

Actor, Playwright, Motivational Speaker, Dissability Activist.

Robert Horton was born in Los Angeles, California, USA as Meade Howard Horton Jr. He was an actor, known for Wagon Train (1957), As the World Turns (1956) and A Man Called Shenandoah (1965). He was married to Mary Katherine Jobe (1945-1950), Barbara Ruick (1953-1956), and Marilynn Bradley (1960-2016).

Robert Horton was often described as "6’ of redheaded dynamite" (though he’s actually a shade over 6’), and we, his loyal fans, certainly agree with that! Even though his hair is now a gorgeous "silver," he still packs plenty of dynamite! His hobbies include flying and collecting fancy cars. He owned his own plane, a Piper Comanche 250, from 1957 to 1998, and he logged over a thousand hours while flying all across the country, often with his accomplished wife Marilynn as his co-pilot and navigator.

Regarding his cars, Mr. Horton said, "I don't show my cars, I drive them. The two don't go together. My hobby is my cars, and they keep me very busy."  His favorite movie is Uncertain Glory, and his favorite actors were Errol Flynn and Myna Loy. Mr. Horton lists among his greatest thrills and accomplishments: his first solo flight, the Command Performance for Queen Elizabeth, and being honored on This is Your Life. In 1963, Bob also made the list of the Ten Best Dressed Men, along with President John Kennedy, James Garner, and Joey Bishop. His quote to live by comes from a sign that hung in his father's office:

"Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence.
Persistence and determination are omnipotent."

Mr. Horton did all of his own riding and stunts on most of the Wagon Train and A Man Called Shenandoah series, and he owned the Appaloosa horse he often rode in both series. The Appaloosa's name was "Stormy Night" since he got him on a stormy night at a rodeo in Idaho. "Little Buck" was the name of the horse he rode early in the Wagon Train series.

 
FILMOGRAPHY
Red River (1988 Remake for TV)
Foreign Exchange (1970, British)
The Spy Killer (1969, British)
The Green Slime (1969)
The Dangerous Days of Kiowa Jones (1966)
The Man is Armed (1956)
Men of the Fighting Lady (1954)
Prisoner of War (1954)
Arena (1953)
The Story of Three Loves (1953)
Bright Road (1953)
Code Two (1953)
Apache War Smoke (1952)
Pony Soldier (1952)
Return of the Texan (1952)
The Tanks are Coming (1951)
A Walk in the Sun (1945)
 
TELEVISION
Wagon Train (1957-1962)
Murder She Wrote (1989)
Houston Knights (1987)
As the World Turns (1982)
The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries (1978)
Police Woman (1976)
Longstreet (1972)
A Man Called Shenandoah (1966)
The Red Skeleton Hour (1963)
Armstrong Circle Theatre (1962)
The Barbara Stanwyck Show (1961)
Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1956-1960)

A full listing of his credits, go to imdb.com.

 
Go to Robert Horton's Website
 
Robert Horton on the Internet Movie Database
 
 

 

 
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